Passenger Cars N

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$42.99
$46.98 -8.49%
in stock

The Bombardier BiLevel Coach is a bilevel passenger railcar built by multiple manufacturers: Hawker Siddeley Canada-SNC Lavalin, the Canadian Car and Foundry (Can Car), the UTDC-SNC Lavalin, and Bombardier Transportation. They are designed to carry up to 360 passengers for commuter railways. These carriages are easily identifiable: they are double-decked and are shaped like elongated octagons.

$117.99
$134.98 -12.59%
in stock

The Bombardier BiLevel Coach is a bilevel passenger railcar built by multiple manufacturers: Hawker Siddeley Canada-SNC Lavalin, the Canadian Car and Foundry (Can Car), the UTDC-SNC Lavalin, and Bombardier Transportation. They are designed to carry up to 360 passengers for commuter railways. These carriages are easily identifiable: they are double-decked and are shaped like elongated octagons.

$42.99
$46.98 -8.49%
in stock

The Bombardier BiLevel Coach is a bilevel passenger railcar built by multiple manufacturers: Hawker Siddeley Canada-SNC Lavalin, the Canadian Car and Foundry (Can Car), the UTDC-SNC Lavalin, and Bombardier Transportation. They are designed to carry up to 360 passengers for commuter railways. These carriages are easily identifiable: they are double-decked and are shaped like elongated octagons.

$168.75
$225.00 -25%
in stock

The Kato Santa Fe Super Chief 8-Car Passenger Set brings a legendary streamliner to your N Scale layout. As the flagship of the streamliner fleet, Santa Fe's Super Chief offered fast travel between Los Angeles and Chicago in a luxury all-sleeper train. Often called the "Train of the Stars" many publicity photos showed celebrities climbing aboard at Los Angeles. The Super Chief train was typically hauled behind gleaming silver-and-red Warbonnet EMD F7 diesel locomotives. In later years the train was combined with the Hi-Level El Capitan coach train.

$88.00
$110.00 -20%
in stock

Phase III, introduced in 1976, is still used on some equipment. On both passenger cars and locomotives, the outer white pinstripes were removed while the inner stripe was widened, resulting in red, white, and blue stripes of equal width. Turboliners and the LRC test train were painted in white, with the stripes at the bottom of the train. This scheme was introduced "for safety, graphic aid and saving money", as the white band was highly reflective and provided a place for car information, and the standard widths made better use of raw material.

$210.00
$280.00 -25%
in stock

The Olympian Hiawatha ran through scenic Idaho, Montana's Bitterroot Mountains and Washington's Cascade range. This was advertised as being a speedliner. The railroad contracted industrial designer Brooks Stevens to design the train consist, which included some unique and signature cars of the Milwaukee Road. In 1952, the first full-length "Super Dome" cars were added, which included 68 dome seats and 28 lounge seats. The dome area featured seats positioned lengthwise, facing the 625 square foot double-pane windows - ideal for sightseeing yet insulated for harsh weather. The Olympian Hiawatha was a favorite of many travelers during the post-war travel boom and continued to operate into 1961.

$44.00
$55.00 -20%
in stock

The Viewliner sleeper came into service around the same time as the Amfleet II, providing sleeping accommodations for Amtrak’s trains on such routes as the Lake Shore, Cardinal, Silver Star, and others. Together, the Amfleet II and Viewliner car series provide necessary overnight train service from Chicago, to New York, and even down to Florida and New Orleans.

$210.00
$280.00 -25%
in stock

The Kato Santa Fe El Capitan 10-Car Passenger Set brings a legendary streamliner to your N Scale layout. Second only to the Super Chief in importance, Santa Fe's El Capitan offered equally fast travel at more affordable coach fares. Refitted in 1956 with new Hi-Level cars to provide maximum seating, the unique train was later combined with the Super Chief beginning in 1958 during off-peak travel seasons. This 10-car train was typically hauled behind EMD F7s or Alco PA diesels.

$88.00
$110.00 -20%
in stock

Phase III, introduced in 1976, is still used on some equipment. On both passenger cars and locomotives, the outer white pinstripes were removed while the inner stripe was widened, resulting in red, white, and blue stripes of equal width. Turboliners and the LRC test train were painted in white, with the stripes at the bottom of the train. This scheme was introduced "for safety, graphic aid and saving money", as the white band was highly reflective and provided a place for car information, and the standard widths made better use of raw material. 

$44.00
$55.00 -20%
in stock

The Viewliner sleeper came into service around the same time as the Amfleet II, providing sleeping accommodations for Amtrak’s trains on such routes as the Lake Shore, Cardinal, Silver Star, and others. Together, the Amfleet II and Viewliner car series provide necessary overnight train service from Chicago, to New York, and even down to Florida and New Orleans.

$80.00
$100.00 -20%
in stock

In 1935 the Santa Fe inaugurated its premier first class sleeping car train the "Super Chief". The Super Chief was frequently patronized by Hollywood stars because of its fine accommodations, fine dining and fast 39 hr 45 min trip between the Chicago and LOs Angeles through the rich scenery of the American Southwest. It quickly became the most recognized train in the United States with its sleek silver and red warbonnet painted F units in the lead.

$213.75
$285.00 -25%
in stock

In 1971 Amtrak, “America’s Railroad”, was born, and with it was born the responsibility of maintaining America’s passenger services. Taking up among others the Santa Fe’s luxury “Super Chief” and coach class “El Capitan” trains, Amtrak quickly set about attempting to create its own image for these classic stainless trains, adorning them with bold red, white and blue stripes and the Chevron logo (known today as Phase I colors) which would be synonymous with Amtrak service for nearly three decades.

$40.00
$50.00 -20%
in stock

During its beginnings, Amtrak inherited its passenger cars from other railroads. Old, steam heated and in dire need of upgrades, Amtrak set out to replace these cars in 1973 with the purchase of the first Amfleet cars from Budd. This initial batch of 492 cars were the Amfleet I - with a door and vestibule on either end (unlike their single-doored successor), these cars fell into a few different varieties but essentially broke down into coach and dinette variants. Despite the introduction of their newer cousins, Amfleet I's are still in use by Amtrak, primarily for shorter distance routes.

$100.00
$125.00 -20%
in stock

During its beginnings, Amtrak inherited its passenger cars from other railroads. Old, steam heated and in dire need of upgrades, Amtrak set out to replace these cars in 1973 with the purchase of the first Amfleet cars from Budd. This initial batch of 492 cars were the Amfleet I - with a door and vestibule on either end (unlike their single-doored successor), these cars fell into a few different varieties but essentially broke down into coach and dinette variants. Despite the introduction of their newer cousins, Amfleet I's are still in use by Amtrak, primarily for shorter distance routes.

$24.00
$30.00 -20%
in stock

The Viewliner sleeper came into service around the same time as the Amfleet II, providing sleeping accommodations for Amtrak’s trains on such routes as the Lake Shore, Cardinal, Silver Star, and others. Together, the Amfleet II and Viewliner car series provide necessary overnight train service from Chicago, to New York, and even down to Florida and New Orleans.

$88.00
$110.00 -20%
in stock

Beginning in 1993, Phase IV was introduced as a striking departure from the traditional red, white, and blue style seen previously. Brought into service with the delivery of the newer Superliner II cars, Phase IV has two thin red stripes and a thick dark blue stripe. In 1997, Amtrak extended the scheme to locomotives, initially GE P42DC diesel locomotives on Northeast Corridor services.

$172.50
$230.00 -25%
in stock

In the 1940’s, the Southern Pacific “Morning Daylight” was possibly the world’s most beautiful train, its orange and red striping being reserved for the SP’s premier train lines. This “Morning Daylight” consist ran between Los Angeles and San Francisco along the beautiful California coast, past cities such as Ventura, Santa Barbara, Salinas and San Jose. Heading up the “Morning Daylight” was the specially built steam locomotive, the GS-4, one of the most well known steam engines ever built.

$44.00
$55.00 -20%
in stock

Phase III, introduced in 1976, is still used on some equipment. On both passenger cars and locomotives, the outer white pinstripes were removed while the inner stripe was widened, resulting in red, white, and blue stripes of equal width. Turboliners and the LRC test train were painted in white, with the stripes at the bottom of the train. This scheme was introduced "for safety, graphic aid and saving money", as the white band was highly reflective and provided a place for car information, and the standard widths made better use of raw material.

$24.00
$30.00 -20%
in stock

The Superliner II fleet was introduced in 1990 as Amtrak's next generation of its now ubiquitous Superliners. Visually very similar to their older cousins, the Superliner II's have a host of mechanical and electrical improvements to their design as well as construction. One of the new styles of car introduced with this new generation of cars was the "Transition Sleeper", or "Transition Dormitory" car. Intended to replace the aging High-Level Step Down cars, the Transition Sleeper fulfills a similar role by having high and low level diaphragms on either end of the car as well as having on-board crew accommodations.

$88.00
$110.00 -20%
in stock

Beginning in 1993, Phase IV was introduced as a striking departure from the traditional red, white, and blue style seen previously. Brought into service with the delivery of the newer Superliner II cars, Phase IV has two thin red stripes and a thick dark blue stripe. In 1997, Amtrak extended the scheme to locomotives, initially GE P42DC diesel locomotives on Northeast Corridor services.

$195.00
$260.00 -25%
in stock

In the 1940’s, the Southern Pacific “Morning Daylight” was possibly the world’s most beautiful train, its orange and red striping being reserved for the SP’s premier train lines. This “Morning Daylight” consist ran between Los Angeles and San Francisco along the beautiful California coast, past cities such as Ventura, Santa Barbara, Salinas and San Jose. Heading up the “Morning Daylight” was the specially built steam locomotive, the GS-4, one of the most well known steam engines ever built.